Tag Archives: South China Sea

Vincent Siew Fellow joing our team

Ms. Sophie Chao has joined the project on “Beijing-Washington Power Shift in the South China Sea” for three month as a Vincent Siew Fellow.  After her stay in Sweden Ms. Chao  will pursue her M.A. at Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University in fall 2017.

For more information see: https://www.ui.se/english/about/staff/sophie-chao/

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New project on the South China Sea after the ruling of the International Court of Arbitration

New project on The Beijing-Washington Power Shift in the South China Sea after the ruling of the International Court of Arbitration in collaboration with The Association of Foreign Relations, Taipei, Taiwan.

The project looks to track political, military and diplomatic developments in the South China Sea and compare the impacts of the afore-mentioned in addition to those of other significant cases. The project also seeks to examine the role and use of soft power and its projection in the South China Sea. It is hoped that different viewpoints and perspectives could be shared, exchanged and discussed between the two sides.

Besides research on the topic, seminars and workshops will be held in Taiwan and in Sweden. The project also includes exchange, with a Vincent Siew Fellow being based at the Swedish Institute of International Affairs during spring 2017 to conduct research within the scope of this project.

Partners:
The Association of Foreign Relations, Taipei, Taiwan
The Swedish Institute of International Affairs, Stockholm, Sweden

Key participants:
Dr. Mikael Weissmann (principal investigator, Sweden)
Assoc. Prof. Kwei-Bo Huang, AFR Secretary-General (principal investigator, Taiwan)
Dr. Emma Björnehed (project manager)

For more information see the project page.

 

 

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Special Issue on “China’s Maritime Embroilments”

asian_survey_coverA special issue on “China’s Maritime Embroilments” that I have co-edited has just been published in Asian Survey. This issue originates in a conference I orgainsed on “Collaboration at Sea”, kindly funded by a grant from Riksbankens Jubileumsfond.

I have co-written the introduction with Prof. Lowell Dittmer (“China’s Maritime Embroilments” [FULL TEXT]) and an article titled “The South China Sea: Still No War on the Horizon” [FULL TEXT]. In my article I am using a conflict transformation framework to demonstrate that in fact positive transformations have taken place in the South China Sea between 1991 and 2007. I am arguing that even though these transformations have been weakened in recent years, particularly regarding actor behaviour, a major armed conflict is still highly unlikely.

The full table of content is as follows (PDF):

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Chinese Soft Power and ASEAN’s Constructive Engagement: Sino-ASEAN relations and the South China Sea

In an article in Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia I address the question what is left of two decades of positive engagement under the umbrella of Chinese Soft Power and ASEAN Constructive Engagement after the South China Sea having once again arisen to the top of the East Asian security debate after a decade of silence. This conflict is in many ways a litmus test of China’s relations with ASEAN and its member states, a conflict embedded in, and a manifestation of, the overarching relations. If the two sides cannot manage the SCS, what is next?

You can read my article on the Kyoto Review website:

Chinese Soft Power and ASEAN’s Constructive Engagement: Sino-ASEAN relations and the South China Sea (Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia, Issue 15: South China Sea, March 2014)

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